The University of Florida Astrophysics Seminar is held on Wednesdays at 2:00pm. During the Fall 2021 semester, seminars will be held virtually via Zoom unless otherwise noted.

Fall 2021 Schedule

September 22: Angelo Ricarte (Center for Astrophysics/Harvard)

Title: Supermassive Black Holes from Microparsecs to Megaparsecs

Abstract:

We believe that a supermassive black hole lurks at the center of every massive galaxy, where they can shine as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) when supplied with gas to accrete.  These black holes are believed to be important for regulating gas cooling in massive galaxies and clusters via "AGN feedback," whose details are poorly understood.  The problems of supermassive black hole growth and feedback span roughly 10 orders of magnitude in spatial and temporal scale, an intractable problem for a single simulation.  In this seminar, I will discuss my theoretical work spanning this range in spatial scales: from modeling AGN central engines for the Event Horizon Telescope, to studies of the black hole-galaxy co-evolution with the Romulus cosmological simulations and semi-analytic models.  These studies help stitch together properties of AGN central engines and how they are connected to their host galaxies.
Link to recording

October 6: Astrid Lamberts (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur)

Title: Neutron stars and black holes, what do we know of the astrophysical populations observed with GW?

Abstract:

The last 5 years have brought the first detections of binary black hole mergers, binary neutron star mergers, and the merger of mixed neutron star-black hole pairs was announced very recently by the LIGO/Virgo/KAGRA collaboration. To date, more than fifty detections have been made public, allowing for the first statistical studies of the underlying populations. After a brief introduction to GW detections, I will present general trends that can be inferred from the observed population, focussing mostly on the binary black holes. Then I will highlight a few recent « exceptional » detections, including the neutron star black hole merger events. I will explain how these discoveries are connected to massive stellar evolution, high energy astrophysics and global star formation accros cosmic time.

November 3: Benny Trakhtenbrot (Tel Aviv University)

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December 1: Christopher Berry (University of Glasgow)

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Other Events

Students may receive credit for attending the Astrophysics Seminar by registering for PHY 6391.