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PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM SCHEDULE

FALL 2022

Colloquia begin at 3:00pm on Thursdays and are held in NPB 1002 unless otherwise noted.


Contact: Imre Bartos (imrebartos@ufl.edu)


Department of Physics Colloquium Committee: 

Imre Bartos (chair), Laura Blecha, Dominique Laroche, Konstantin Matchev, 

Guenakh Mitselmakher, Khander Muttalib, Tarek Saab, David Tanner, and BingKan Xue



September 1 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Yuxuan Wang 

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title

Higher-order topological superconductors and Majoranna quantum gates

 

Abstract

We will first review the idea of manipulating Majorana non-Abelian anyons for topological quantum computation, and then introduce the concept of higher-order topological superconductors. We show that higher-order topological superconductors naturally host Majorana modes at the corners and hinges of the sample. We discuss several possible realizations of higher-order topological superconductors, and in one setup, we show that the Majorana modes can be manipulated for braiding processes by tuning a Zeeman field. We show that such a setup can achieve full braiding, exchanging, and a long-saught-after Magic gate of the Majorana zero modes, providing a new route toward topological quantum computation. 

 

Host

Steve Hagen


September 8 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Paul Fulda

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title

Current highlights and future prospects of UF ground- and space-based gravitational wave detector research

 

Abstract

The last decade has been a revolutionary one for gravitational wave (GW) astronomy. In 2015 Advanced LIGO made the first detection of GWs from colliding black holes, leading to the 2017 Nobel Physics Prize, and revelations about the evolution of black holes and neutron stars, formation of heavy elements, and the nature of gravity in the strong field regime have been streaming in ever since. This stream is poised to become a flood in the next decade as a new generation of detectors, both on Earth and in space, come online. In this talk I will first give an overview of my research group's major activities in the areas of ground- and space-based gravitational wave detection, touching on highlights such as: (1) Delivery of low-optical loss Faraday isolators for the latest LIGO upgrade "A+". (2) Technology development for further LIGO sensitivity improvements. (3) Stability testing of the LISA telescope prototypes. (4) LISA instrument simulation and performance modeling. I'll then turn the focus towards the future and discuss the prospects for the next few decades of GW instrument science research at UF. On Earth this implies the next generation of observatory facilities, under the banner of the Cosmic Explorer project in the US. In space, despite LISA's launch being projected over a decade away, the wheels are already in motion for the next generation of detectors, with the goal of exploring still more of the as-yet unobserved GW spectrum. 

 

Host

Steve Hagen


September 15 (Thursday) 

 

Speaker

Sergey Klimenko (UF) 

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title

Einstein's Zoo: the hunt for new species 

 

Abstract

With the first direct observation of gravitational waves (GW) on September 14, 2015, the advanced GW detectors opened new possibilities to explore our Universe. The first GW signal was not from a much-anticipated binary neutron stars (BNS), but from a quite unexpected merger of binary black holes (BBH), which challenged the existing BBH formation models and inspired new insights into the evolution of massive stars. Several years later, the GW detectors have recorded two BNS and more then 90 BBH signals, including a BBH merger on May 21, 2019 – a possible missing link between stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes. That was another unexpected GW event, which has far-reaching astrophysical implications and marks the beginning of an active research on a new class of BBH sources. Future observations with improving LIGO detectors are likely to discover anticipated or possibly new GW sources - we should be ready for unexpected. I will talk about LIGO observations, detection of transient (burst) GW signals from a wide range of potential astrophysical sources, detection challenges for signals with poorly known or uncertain models and discuss astrophysical implications of the burst analysis. 

 

Host

Steve Hagen


September 22 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Sergey Frolov

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title

Superconductors and Semiconductors, Nanowires and Majorana, Research and Integrity

 

Abstract

This talk will be on three topics, but in a way it is one. My research focus and passion is the proximity effect. It is when superconducting correlations are induced in a non-superconducting material. Because superconductivity is always tied to a spin order, proximity effects get especially rich when the non-superconductor is magnetic, or has strong spin-orbit coupling for electrons. Superconductivity induced by proximity must take into account these interactions in the new host, and can evolve into exotic phases such as triplet or topological superconductivity. This is where Majorana modes come in, they are edge states of a topological superconductor with unusual properties such as predicted non-Abelian exchange. For the past decade I was busy studying their possible manifestations in semiconductor nanowires, where superconductivity is subject to both spin-orbit and magnetic field effects at the same time. We got very excited at first when we found experimental signatures, zero-bias peaks, that behaved as expected for Majorana modes. We shortly learned that another effect, non-topological Andreev states, can exhibit all of the same signatures. Despite these dual interpretations, papers claiming new Majorana sightings kept appearing. After I and my colleague Vincent Mourik looked into extra data from those papers we found unjustified data selection that invalidated conclusions. Several papers are under investigation as a result of our work. In my talk I want to touch on the implications of this, and sketch a path forward for our topic and for the broader field of quantum and condensed matter physics.

 

Host

Dominique Laroche


September 29 (Thursday)

 

 

CANCELLED

due to Hurricane Ian

 


October 6 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Zack Slepian

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

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October 13 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Abdelkader Kara (UCF)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Kathryn McGill


October 20 (Thursday)

 

Speaker


 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

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October 27 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Harrison Prosper

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Konstantin Matchev


November 3 (Thursday)

 

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Location

NPB 1002

 

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November 10 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Sergo Jindariani (Fermilab)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Andrey Korytov


November 17 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Sebastian Will (Columbia)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Imre Bartos


December 1 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

John Kasianowicz (NIST, USF, Columbia)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title

Measuring Molecules at the Single Molecule Limit: Sequencing DNA, Sizing Polymers, Identifying Proteins (& More) with Nanometer-Scale Pores

 

Abstract

Biological nanometer-scale protein pores are the basis of nerve and muscle activity. With the goal of providing low-cost measurements for health care applications, we have been adapting several types of nanopores for the detection, characterization, and identification of molecules. For example, when a single molecule enters a pore, its physical and chemical properties control both the degree by which it reduces the ionic current (that otherwise flows freely) and its dwell time there. Thus far, our work led to two novel DNA sequencing methods, the ability to discriminate between individual polymers based on their size, the means to quantitate protein concentration, and a technique for identifying subtly different species of metallo-nanoparticles. In addition, we demonstrated that a nanopore can also be used to identify proteins. This new method could markedly improve healthcare diagnostics and allow more blood analyses to be performed at point-of-care facilities. We are also investigating the possible use of nanopores as the read head in molecular-based memory storage devices and the role of ion channels in the competition between bacteria. This ongoing work is a collaborative effort with groups at Columbia University (Jingyue Ju), CY Cergy Paris Université (Abdelghani Oukhaled), Freiburg University (Jan Behrends), and the DoD (Sina Bavari, Rekha Panchal, Captain Rick Gussio, and Colonel Kelly Halverson).

 

Host

David Tanner


December 7 (Wednesday)

 

Speaker

Ilya Nemenman

 

Location

NPB 2205

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

BingKan Xue


December 8 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Laura Reina

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Konstantin Matchev


December 15 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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SPRING 2023




January 12 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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January 19 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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January 26 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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February 2 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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February 9 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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February 16 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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February 23 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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March 2 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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March 9 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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March 23 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Alessandra Corsi (Texas Tech)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Imre Bartos


March 30 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Doninique Laroche (UF)

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Steve Hagen


April 6 (Thursday)

 

Speaker

Juan Guan

 

Location

NPB 1002

 

Title


 

Abstract


 

Host

Steve Hagen


April 13 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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April 20 (Thursday)

 

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NPB 1002

 

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