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PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM SCHEDULE
Fall 2020

The Colloquia are via Zoom on Thursdays at 4:05 PM

Contact: D. Tanner uftanner@ufl.edu)
Department of Physics Colloquium Committee:
Tanner (chair), Fulda, Matchev, Mitselmakher, Wang


August 27

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September 3

  Speaker Graduate Student Meeting with Dr. Xiaoguang Zhang 4:00pm in 1002 NPB
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September 8 - Special Colloquium

  Speaker Sergei Klimenko
  Title GW190521: an “Impossible” Binary Black Hole
  Abstract With the first direct observation of gravitational waves (GW) on September 14, 2015, the advanced LIGO detectors opened new possibilities to explore our Universe. This first GW signal was not from the much-anticipated binary neutron star inspiral (BNS), but from a quite unexpected merger of binary black holes (BBH). Now, five years later, the LIGO GW detectors have recorded two BNS and more than 50 BBH signals, including GW190521?a possible missing link between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes. This is another unexpected BBH event, which informs our understanding of the evolution of the most massive stars and the growth of massive black holes. I will talk about the LIGO detectors, data analysis, and detections of the most cataclysmic astrophysical events in the Universe.
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September 10 - No Colloquium

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September 17

  Speaker Giovanni Vignale, University of Missouri - https://ufl.zoom.us/j/91807944357
  Title Hydrodynamics of quantum electron liquids
  Abstract Electric and thermal transport in electronic systems has long been described in terms of a single-particle picture, which emphasizes the role of collisions between electrons and impurities or phonons, while electron-electron collisions play a secondary role. It is only in the past two decades that advances in the fabrication of ultra clean samples have refocused the interest on collective hydrodynamic transport - a transport regime which is controlled by the nearly conserved quantities: number, momentum, and energy, and by electron-electron interactions. In this talk I review some of the recent theoretical and experimental progress in our understanding of electronic hydrodynamics in graphene-based materials. I focus on thermal transport and its relation to electric transport, epitomized by the Wiedemann-Franz law which, in its conventional form, predicts a universal ratio between electric and thermal resistivities. Significant deviations from this prediction are found in single layer and double layer graphene, both in the doped case, where the Wiedemann-Franz ratio is reduced, and in the undoped case, where it is greatly enhanced. In the latter case an interesting scenario emerges, in which a small amount of disorder helps to expose an underlying singularity of the transport coefficients: vanishing thermal resistivity, finite electric resistivity, and diverging Wiedemann-Franz ratio and Seebeck coefficient.
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September 24

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October 1

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October 8

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October 15

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October 22

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October 29

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November 5

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November 12

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November 19

  Speaker Aashish Clerk, University of Chicago
  Title One-way quantum interactions for fun and profit
  Abstract The most common kinds of interactions in physics obey a basic kind of reciprocity: when two systems or particles interact, each one influences the other, and information flows in both directions. In this talk, I’ll discuss general methods for engineering interactions that break this symmetry, in a fully consistent quantum setting. These engineered “one-way” quantum interactions open up a host of unusual possibilities, from new methods for manipulating and processing quantum information, to new kinds of topological and many-body physics. I’ll introduce some of the basic theoretical ideas that underlie these unusual interactions, and connections to recent interest in “non-Hermitian” quantum systems. I’ll also discuss recent experimental implementations in quantum optomechanical systems and superconducting quantum circuits.
  Host Selman Hershfield

December 3

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PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM SCHEDULE

Spring 2021

The Colloquia are in Room 1002 NPB on Thursday at 4:05 PM
Refreshments will be served starting at 3:15 PM in NPB 2205

Contact: D. Tanner uftanner@ufl.edu)
Department of Physics Colloquium Committee:
Tanner (chair), Fulda, Matchev, Mitselmakher, Wang


January 7

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January 14

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January 21

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January 28

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February 4

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February 11

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February 18

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February 25

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March 4

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March 11

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March 18

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March 25

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April 1

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April 8

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April 15

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